Uses Of Apps In Surgery

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As mobile communication technology is expanding globally in smartphones, handheld tablets and hybrids of the two, there was a profound change in the software and hardware that are used for everyday tasks. Health workers have increasing access to this technology. Surgeons have experienced challenges to introduce such technology because of potential interference of complex devices in the operating room, but later work to change this paradigm.

Preoperatively, apps are available to help patients understand what procedures are suggested. To help patients with complicated lingo of anatomy when describing surgery, some apps allow 3-dimensional view of your body ability to zoom and rotation (eg 3D Brain, Shoulder DecideMD).

Although it can not replace a multidisciplinary preoperative evaluation clinic, the application can be useful as a means to avoid the cancellation of operations in the last minute. Surgeons and residents can even refresh their knowledge of anatomy operational in preparation for the actions performed poorly. Applications are available in the classic procedural texts such as Zollinger, Campbell orthopedics, timely diagnosis and treatment operations and operations AO Reference.

These applications provide instant updates at hand surgeons as reference books may not be practical.

Intraoperative, apps help surgeons to improve the availability of imaging. Apps, including Mobile MIM and OsiriX HD is now available to load preoperative imaging in tablet-friendly approaches help surgeons prepare individual patients and reduce frustration from images in the operating room workstations that time out.

Such apps can also facilitate the exchange of imaging results between different jurisdictions and hospitals. Even Checklist WHO Surgical Safety is available as an app. The title SafeSurgery, it covers all three phases of the surgical safety checklist and can help review compliance behavior safe surgery.

Post-operative applications include SurgicalLogbook, which enables surgeons to keep a log of the patients for which the complete procedures. For trainees, this system is essential to satisfy surgical training requirements and can help surgeons documentation for practice audits required for successful recredentialling. Communication Platforms have been developed as apps to facilitate interaction between surgeons, whereas doctors, other health professionals and patients. For example SurgiChart stores images, medical results and information about procedures. Such robust and timely communication platforms deserves to be explored in this era of rapid communication.

As mobile communications and related apps proliferate, it is important for surgeons to remain well informed. Apart from reducing the burden of daily work, surgeons can anticipate new point-of-care knowledge. Some warnings wear control. First mobile communications and apps are not necessarily regulated or reviewed by medical authorities. The content of these apps is no substitute for astute clinical judgment and rigorous peer-reviewed health literature. Where possible, the highest standard for scientific rigor be linked to data in the app.

Secondly, apps that use and store confidential patient information be particularly vulnerable to accidental loss or theft. Passwords and robust encryption technology is a must to prevent infringement of privacy. Institutional policies must be constantly updated to undergo precautions and update these for surgeons and trainees.

Finally, the proliferation of such technology does not detract from the strong personal communications critical to achieve top quality surgical care.

Source by Nethra Manu

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