What Should I Consider When Choosing A Bathrobe Or Robe?

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1. When and where do I plan to wear robe most frequently?

We often wear bathrobes as a quick cover-up while dressing or relaxing prior to going to bed. If you wear a robe for this type of purpose, then terry cotton or cotton/polyester are good choices. If you prefer a soothing, soft warmer robe than the synthetic velour or polyester robes provide a good choice. The cotton/bamboo option is another soft and silky fabric that is very comfortable to wear and dries quickly after getting wet.

If you are buying a robe for use after being in a hot tub, you might want to consider how the fabrics feel when they become wet. Terry cotton and other cotton combination fabrics will feel cold after getting wet when you wrap the robe around yourself after getting out of a hot tub or pool. This fact might not be a major concern during the warm months, but the robe might feel uncomfortable during the cooler winter months. The polyester fabrics will not absorb water, so feel warmer when the weather is cooler. In hot weather, the terry cotton and cotton/bamboo fabrics will absorb the moisture off your skin and you will feel cooler after swimming or going into a hot tub.

2. Do I want a full length or shorter robe?

When we think of robes, a flowing long cozy robe comes easily to mind. However, you might need to decide whether you might want a shorter robe if you are using it for quick changes or in the morning over your pajamas. Longer cozy robes suggest lounging and relaxing in the evening or on a lazy Sunday morning to read the newspapers and have a latte. If you are using the robe as a cover-up after soothing relaxation session in a hot tub, a longer robe might be a good option for the cooler or windy months, while a shower wrap or short robe might be a cooler option when it is hot.

3. What are some of the differences in Fabrics or Fibers?

The differences in fibers or fabrics used to make robes relates largely to whether the fabric absorbs moisture or resists moisture. Fabrics made with terry cotton, 100% cotton, bamboo/cotton or cotton/polyester combinations absorb moisture away from your body. Cotton velour provides a smooth feeling against your body but does not absorb moisture as easily as the fibers have been cropped more closely. The synthetic fabrics use a polyester fiber which resists moisture. The synthetic velours offer a soft luxurious feeling next to your body, which provides warmth without feeling wet.

5. Why would I choose 100% Organic Cotton robes?

Fibers used for weaving fabrics can be grown using chemicals or dipped in preserving chemicals that create an allergic response in some people. 100% organic cotton robes have been produced in a manner which is free of harmful chemicals. This process ensures that these robes do not create an allergenic response when someone wears the robes. If you or someone for whom you are purchasing a robe has allergies, then an Organic Cotton robe is a good choice.

6. Some times the terms describing the size of robes are confusing. What are the differences between a man’s robe and a woman’s robe?

Largely the differences are in the length and way that the robe has been designed. Men’s robes typically are larger through the shoulder area then offer a looser overall fit. The majority are longer as well.

Women’s robes tend to be smaller fitting with a narrower fit in the shoulder area. The ballerina and spa robes are shorter and can be used as a cover-up to put on make-up or style your hair prior to go out to a social event/work.

Unisex or ‘one size fits all/most” robes tend to have a more generous design which is loose and not as form fitting. If you are buying a unisex bathrobe, there is often a choice of sizes where you have to select a shoulder or chest size in combination with height measurement. Unisex robes are often a good choice if you require a plus-size robe, as you can match your measurements to those of the robe to ensure that you are comfortable when wearing your robe.

Source by Judith Treherne

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